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Language lecture assesses regional dialects

10 November 2017

Why do some Midlanders say ‘mom’ rather than ‘mum’? Since when did ‘you are’ become ‘youm’? And how did ‘don’t’ become ‘doh’?

One of the UK’s leading experts on English regional dialects and accents Professor Urszula Clark will explore the unique features of the Midlands dialect in her inaugural lecture at Aston University on Tuesday 5 December.

Her lecture, titled ‘Staging Language: Place and identity in the enactment, performance and representation of regional dialects’, will investigate why particular features of the region’s dialect still exist and how these connect to social and regional identity at a time of globalisation and media consumption.

The event is free for the general public to attend.

It is being held in Room G11 at Aston University from 6.30pm to 8pm.

Urszula Clark, Professor of English and Linguistics at Aston University, said: "There is a tendency for regional and social dialects of British English to increasingly resemble each other, and in some cases to become ever more like Standard English, particularly in terms of grammar and vocabulary.

"At the same time, how we speak is an integral part of who we are. Features of regional dialects still persist in regions of the UK today. Why is this?

"In this lecture, drawing on my own research, I will answer this question – particularly in relation to imaginative performances and other creative works set in Birmingham and the Black Country."

To book your free place click here.

 

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